Tag Archives: Anne Bishop

February 23, 2015

Books of the Week

  • Burned, Karen Marie Moning
  • Murder Most Persuasive, Tracy Kiely
  • Bound by Flames, Jeaniene Frost
  • As Chimney Sweepers Come to Dust, Alan Bradley
  • Vision in Silver, Anne Bishop
  • Mystery in White, J. Jefferson Farjeon

I’ve read a delightful assortment of books lately, ranging from the romance side of paranormal to classic British mystery to contemporary cozy.
 

Burned is a continuation of Karen Marie Moning’s very successful Fever series. Moning is able to establish that incredible spark between her characters and her readers, and it’s no surprise that she has devoted followers for this series, which ties a lot of her work together. If you’re a fan of Mac and Jericho Barrons, this book is a must-read.
 

Tracy Kiely was new to me, but came highly recommended. Murder Most Persuasive is an entry in a series about Elizabeth Parker, professional fact-checker and Austen devotee, who has a slew of colorful relatives (including two sisters) and a talent for detection. She’s a very likeable character, and this book was a great read. Murder is set in the Washington area, but from hints in the book, others in the series are set elsewhere.
 

Who doesn’t love Jeaniene Frost? The third Leila and Vlad book contains more trouble from Vlad’s many enemies, of course, and also trouble from Vlad’s overprotective attitude when it comes to Leila. There’s a lot of action in Bound by Flames, and it’s just as successful as Frost’s previous books.
 

Alan Bradley’s series about the very young and very intelligent Flavia de Luce continues on course with Chimney Sweepers, when our heroine is shipped off to Canada to her mother’s former boarding school, a training ground for spies. I had hoped this place would bring happiness to Flavia, but she is hopelessly homesick – and wrapped up in a murder inquiry from almost the moment she arrives.
 

I was very excited to get an ARC of Vision in Silver, Anne Bishop’s third novel set in a world where the indigenous people are the supernaturals, and they rule. Humans are in America because they are allowed in certain areas.  Meg, a blood prophet, has escaped from a compound where women like her are used for their prophetic ability and then cast aside. She is sheltering in a Courtyard where Indigenes trade with humans, but it’s a time of crisis for the Indigenes. Humans are rebelling against their restrictions. Silver is a very satisfying entry in an increasingly enthralling series. This book will be out MARCH 3.
 

J. Jefferson Farjeon is one of the semi-forgotten writers of Britain’s Golden Age of Mystery. Mystery in White has a classic set-up. An ill-assorted group of people get off a train stranded in the snow and make their way across the countryside. Freezing, they stumble upon a house. Its door is open, the fires are lit, and food is prepared. But there is no one inside. With some hesitation, they avail themselves of the shelter, but they are aware that something very strange has happened in that house. Why is there a knife on the floor in the kitchen? If you can find a copy of Mystery in White, you’ll enjoy the journey.
 

Blog

Winter is a traditional reading time, and this winter surely must have broken the record, especially in the northeast. I wonder if Amazon or Barnes and Noble can tell us how many more books were sold this year than last year in the area? It might be interesting to find out.
 

Books are a great way to fight cabin fever. If you can’t get out on the roads, at least you can go somewhere else in your imagination. It’s too bad we can’t harness them to dig out our sidewalks and get snow off our rooftops! There are some things only our own muscles can accomplish.
 

I understand that Spring (at least on the calendar) is just around the corner, though it may be hard for some of us to believe that right now. The Spring publishing season is definitely coming up! I’m awaiting a crop of new and wonderful books.
 

For those of you who are sick of snow and ice, keep your heads down and keep reading. When you look up, it’ll be over!
 

Charlaine Harris

March 9, 2014

Books of the Week:

 

  • After I’m Gone, Laura Lippman
  • The Silence of the Library, Miranda James
  • Murder of Crows, Anne Bishop

 

In the interests of being thorough, I’m re-reading all the Rex Stout books and the Agatha Christie ‘Miss Marple’ novels on my e-reader as I travel. They make for good company!

 

But at home, I read actual, physical books. I had the pleasure of reading three really good ones since my last column. Laura Lippman is one of the best mystery writers in America; it’s easy to say that with qualification. After I’m Gone is a story of love gone wrong, at least in some ways. Cold case investigator “Sandy” Sanchez is investigating the case of Julie, the mistress of Felix Brewer, who fled prosecution twenty-six years before. Though everyone, perhaps including Brewer’s wife Bambi, has assumed that Julie went on the lam with Felix, her body has been found. A lot of history has to be reviewed and reinterpreted.  Did Bambi kill her old rival? Or are Bambi’s daughters guilty? There’s a lot of bitterness, and a dozen secrets, to wade through before the determined Sanchez can get to the bottom of what really happened to Julie Saxony.

 

My long-time friend Miranda James has a hit with her cozy “Cat in the Stacks” mysteries, and deservedly so. The Silence of the Library is another adventure of mild-mannered librarian Charlie Harris and his Maine coon cat, Diesel. Set in Athena, Mississippi, these entertaining and charming books always contain a satisfying mystery and plenty of character development. In Silence, Charlie, a great fan of the Nancy Drew books, gets to meet the author of another series he loved as a boy, the Veronica Thane series. Electra Barnes Cartwright is not in good physical shape, but she’s willing to participate in the library exhibit honoring her and other early writers of YA mysteries. Charlie is thrilled to meet such an icon of his youth, and the passages from one of the Veronica Thane books that punctuate the modern-day narrative provide a fun counterpoint. As Cartwright collectors swarm Athena, one of them is murdered, and Charlie and Diesel have to find the culprit and save the library’s event. You’ll enjoy this, and it’s suitable for all ages.

 

I’d been waiting for what seemed like forever for Anne Bishop’s new “Novel of the Others,” Murder of Crows. The previous book, Written in Red, was one of my 2013 favorites. Murder of Crows continues expanding the world of the Others, one in which humans are a minority and often regarded as food. Meg Corbyn, who has escaped from a secret compound where young female seers are cut to produce a prophecy, is learning to use her built-in talent to benefit her new community. They, in turn, are learning to live around Meg. But it’s an uneasy and uneven process, and the human world is reacting to the increasing tension among the Others and fanatic humans determined to kill them. It’s a much more divided world than we saw in the previous book, but just as intriguing. I really liked this book . . . and now I  have to wait for the next one.

 

Blog: The Instrument

 

My old PC had gotten balky, and I had been having uneasy twinges about it for some time. I kept promising myself that after I’d finished my current book, I’d consider buying something else. I did that for three books.

 

The decision was yanked from my hands when my computer decided to stop recognizing my keyboard. Of course, at first I thought it was the keyboard, and I bought another one. I use the ergonomic Logitech, and I love it, so I had to order that. In the meantime, I got out my laptop and set it up in another location, so I could answer email and so on.

 

But when the new keyboard came, the old computer wouldn’t speak to that one, either. When your machines won’t recognize each other, it’s a scary feeling. There they are, cheek by jowl, refusing to give each other a nod.

 

I had to go off for the weekend, and my husband bravely volunteered to try to reconcile the two by the time I returned. Since I am an optimist, I was blithely certain that all would be well by the time I returned. After all, this month and next month were on my schedule as the big push on the next book. My office had to work in unity.

 

Sadly, all my optimism was for nothing. I returned with food poisoning, after a flight cancellation necessitated another overnight stay, to the wretched news (everything was pretty wretched by then) that the two still weren’t speaking. Hal took the old, sick computer to a repair shop to loosen its tongue, and I looked forward to getting it back in a mood to communicate.

 

It was Not To Be. Poor computer! Its motherboard was fried. It would never speak again.

 

Now I have a shiny looking chrome computer sitting on my desk, and it’s beginning to warm up to the other office machines. So far so good.

 

I didn’t realize how my attitude to work was affected by the machine I was using. I feel quite jaunty with this new computer, and (once again) optimistic about how great a writer I’ll be now that I have something so up-to-date. It’s kind of ridiculous how “new” makes an emotional translation as “better.”

 

So far my printer and keyboard seem to like their new comrade just fine . . . so I’m optimistic.

 

Charlaine Harris